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Let's teach! Primary

Lesson 2

What can different materials do?

Lesson Plan

Preparation

To accompany the digital lesson and summary, you might wish to prepare a variety of materials to show different properties, such as fabric swatches, plasticine, aluminium foil, pieces of foam, polystyrene, thin or thick plastic, flat rock, paper towel, tissue paper and so on, for the pupils to choose from.

For the investigation worksheet, a variety of items with recycling symbols on them will need to be supplied, such as plastic bottles, books made of recycled paper, containers and cans.

Curriculum links

Uses of everyday materials

  • Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses.

Suggested teaching strategies

  • Ensure that pupils understand the difference between subjective (e.g. ugly) and scientific (flexible) descriptions of material properties.
  • Brainstorm and collect a list of words that can be used to describe the properties of materials. One way of doing this could be showing pupils an object and asking them to record one word to describe it on a sticky note.

Introduction

Have pupils to play a quick game of ‘rock, paper, scissors’. Discuss the properties of rock, paper and scissors. Explain that all materials have different things they can do that make them better for some uses than others. Ask pupils to share some ideas about the uses different materials around them can be put to.

Display the digital lesson on your smartboard to introduce the concept of material properties.

The summary and worksheet pages should be used together.

Development

Provide pupils with the summary and worksheet to complete.

The aim of the investigation worksheet is for pupils to understand what some of the symbols on packaging mean. This can help them to make informed choices about the products they choose.

Differentiation

  • Explicitly teach less able pupils how to use tally marks or allow them to record their findings in a different way.
  • Use sentence stems to support less able pupils with completing the pupils and investigation worksheets.
  • More able pupils can predict how they think different products are recycled. They can then research how these are actually recycled and compare their predictions.
  • More able pupils could design a poster to educate others about recycling symbols.

Conclusion

Pupils discuss and compare their findings from the investigation worksheet in pairs or small groups.

Assessment

Worksheet answers
1. Plastic is good for use in water bottles because it is transparent, waterproof, strong and flexible.
2. Answers could include: (a) any item of clothing, paper, eraser, book, pencil case, power cords, posters (b) tables or other furniture, wall, board, computer, scissors (c) table, water bottle, plastic desk mat, window
3. Recycling means using old things to make new things.
4. Glass and rubber are both waterproof. Some pupils may also say they are both strong.
5. Answers may vary but should indicate that because paper is absorbent, weak and flexible, a chair made from it might not be strong enough and could collapse.
6. Answers will vary.

The uses and implications of science question
Answers will vary

Investigation worksheet answers
Teacher check

Preparation

To accompany the digital lesson and summary, you might wish to prepare a variety of materials to show different properties, such as fabric swatches, plasticine, aluminium foil, pieces of foam, polystyrene, thin or thick plastic, flat rock, paper towel, tissue paper and so on, for the pupils to choose from.

For the investigation worksheet, a variety of items with recycling symbols on them will need to be supplied, such as plastic bottles, books made of recycled paper, containers and cans.

Curriculum links

Uses of everyday materials

  • Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses.

Suggested teaching strategies

  • Ensure that pupils understand the difference between subjective (e.g. ugly) and scientific (flexible) descriptions of material properties.
  • Brainstorm and collect a list of words that can be used to describe the properties of materials. One way of doing this could be showing pupils an object and asking them to record one word to describe it on a sticky note.

Introduction

Have pupils to play a quick game of ‘rock, paper, scissors’. Discuss the properties of rock, paper and scissors. Explain that all materials have different things they can do that make them better for some uses than others. Ask pupils to share some ideas about the uses different materials around them can be put to.

Display the digital lesson on your smartboard to introduce the concept of material properties.

The summary and worksheet pages should be used together.

Development

Provide pupils with the summary and worksheet to complete.

The aim of the investigation worksheet is for pupils to understand what some of the symbols on packaging mean. This can help them to make informed choices about the products they choose.

Differentiation

  • Explicitly teach less able pupils how to use tally marks or allow them to record their findings in a different way.
  • Use sentence stems to support less able pupils with completing the pupils and investigation worksheets.
  • More able pupils can predict how they think different products are recycled. They can then research how these are actually recycled and compare their predictions.
  • More able pupils could design a poster to educate others about recycling symbols.

Conclusion

Pupils discuss and compare their findings from the investigation worksheet in pairs or small groups.

Assessment

Worksheet answers
1. Plastic is good for use in water bottles because it is transparent, waterproof, strong and flexible.
2. Answers could include: (a) any item of clothing, paper, eraser, book, pencil case, power cords, posters (b) tables or other furniture, wall, board, computer, scissors (c) table, water bottle, plastic desk mat, window
3. Recycling means using old things to make new things.
4. Glass and rubber are both waterproof. Some pupils may also say they are both strong.
5. Answers may vary but should indicate that because paper is absorbent, weak and flexible, a chair made from it might not be strong enough and could collapse.
6. Answers will vary.

The uses and implications of science question
Answers will vary

Investigation worksheet answers
Teacher check

Student Pages

01 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

Lesson 2

What can different
materials do?

02 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

Lesson 2

What can different
materials do?

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03 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

Some materials are strong, others are soft, and some can bend.

Some can be used again and
others cannot.

04 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

Most materials have many properties.

The following table gives information about some properties materials can have.

05 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

PROPERTY

EXAMPLE

OPPOSITE PROPERTY

EXAMPLE

transparent
it lets light through
(you can see through it)

glass, cellophane, water

opaque
cannot be seen through

wood, gold

waterproof
does not let water through or soak up water

plastic, wax

absorbent
soaks up water

paper towel, cotton (fabric)

06 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

PROPERTY

EXAMPLE

OPPOSITE PROPERTY

EXAMPLE

strong
hard to break or squash

steel, concrete

weak, brittle or flimsy
easy to break

tissue paper, glass (thin)

flexible
can bend or
be twisted easily without breaking

wool, rubber, leather

rigid or inflexible
does not bend or twist

brick, bone china

07 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

Some materials have properties that allow them to be used more than once.

08 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

For example, some planks of wood are so strong and last a long time, they can be taken from old furniture or houses and used to make new products.

09 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

A piece of paper cannot be written on again once you’ve used both sides, but it can be quite easily shredded, mixed with water to make a pulp, and made into new paper.

10 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

Used glass and plastic can also be broken down then remade into new glass or plastic in factories.

11 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

Using materials more than once means less new materials are used up.

12 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

Using old things to make new things is called ‘recycling’.

13 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

You can find out if the products you are using are made from recycled materials, or can be recycled, by looking for the recycling symbol (also called the möbius loop).

14 SCIENCE Year 2 Unit 2 Lesson 2

Lesson 2

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Student Summary

Summary of student page information

Worksheet

Activities for students to complete

Investigation Worksheet

An experiment to consolidate learnings

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